Tuesday, September 19, 2006

Subway Stories - Walk This Way


You have to walk, because unfortunately you can't use a wheelchair at several T locations, including Copley. A recent court decision may signal a step forward in making the Copley T station accessible to all T riders, including those with physical challenges.

The Neighborhood Association Of The Back Bay and The Boston Preservation Alliance sued The Federal Transit Administration and the MBTA alleging that the plan does not comply with state and federal historic preservation laws.

The decision, dated September 14, 2006, by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit in Boston, agrees with the lower court's finding that the plan for the Copley T station does not violate relevant historical preservation statutes.

I'm not sure what will happen next with the case. The Plaintiffs could appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Either way, hopefully this is a step in the right direction towards making the Copley T station accessible.


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11 comments:

wheresmymind said...

All of these train stations should be accesable for all

starry nights said...

I love the subway system and used to ride the "L" in chicgo to and from work.too bad we dont have something like that in california. I think the subway should be accesable by all, especially people in wheelchairs, because they have to get to places too.

Mosilager said...

this is one where i side with the physically challenged of today rather than preserving history. of what use are past buildings if they cannot be enjoyed by people in the present?

Mosilager said...

btw linked you!

Mosilager said...

cool thanks for linking... just that i kept trying to find your comments to get to your blog until i realised that i could just put it on the links :) sometimes too lazy to look at the feed reader.

Anonymous said...

hmm @ wheelchairs .. the chicago subway system is very accessible .. wheelchairs, bikes .. hey you can even bring the kitchen sink. And not just subways .. our buses are wheelchair accessible too

Anali said...

wheresmymind - I agree. My brother has trouble walking and uses crutches or a walker, so I am always noticing where I can go with him or where it will be too difficult.

starrynights - I've only been a few places in California, but it was surprising to me how much everyone has to drive there.

mosilager - I like that perspective. It really makes sense. I love historical sites as much as the next person, but we do have to think about people who are here now.

nabeel - Thanks for stopping by! It sounds like Chicago has gotten it done right.

The Thinking Black Man said...

Hey Anali -

Sounds pretty rough up there!

I ride the DC Metro everyday, and dispite some of the complaints of my fellow locals - the DC metro is outstanding.

They have a really good system of shuttles, kneeling buses, elevators and spacious subway trains for wheelchairs and walkers.

Those of us, fit and healthy enough to stand and walk around unassisted don't always realize how good we have it.

Anali said...

the thinking black man - Welcome! There's definitely room for improvement up here. I've been to DC a bunch of times and I love the Metro. It's a great system and so clean! You've got to love that federal money!

Seeing the restrictions on the T does make me appreciate my mobility and good health. The station that I use has been doing repairs on the escalator for months, so I often have to run up a bunch of stairs to make the train!

Dotm said...

Hope they do agree to make it wheelchair accessable. I think all public places and public means of transportation should be acessable to everyone, including the handicap. Interesting post.

Anali said...

dotm - I think it's just a matter of time, but hopefully it will be done sooner rather than later.

 
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